Articles Tagged with zip-line excursion

News outlets have reported this week that a young Israeli couple on their honeymoon aboard the Allure of the Seas, a Royal Caribbean cruise ship, decided to try zip-lining during one of the ship’s port visits in Roatán, Honduras. What was intended to be the beginning of a long happy life together turned into tragedy as the result of apparent negligence on behalf of the cruise ship.

zipline-300x225While ziplining over a treetop canopy on July 5, 27-year-old Shif Fanken got stuck and stopped halfway down the cable when her husband, 24-year-old Egael Tishman, was released by staff members down the zip-line, resulting in a collision. The couple was rushed to the hospital where the husband died from his injuries. The wife is currently recovering in a hospital in Florida. The cause of the accident is still under investigation. At this time, the safety history and track record of the operator is unknown, nor do we know what knowledge the cruise ship company had previously gathered about the operator prior to the incident.

Many times, there are dangers associated with the shore excursions unknown to the passengers, which could include dangers created by the shore excursion company due to poor safety practices, or dangers created by the areas the shore side excursion companies take their passengers to. In a recent case in the Southern District of Florida, a passenger was injured while participating in a zip-line shore excursion in the Dominica. During the zip-line activity, the passenger was seriously injured when she crashed into padding attached to a tree.

zip-line-222x300The passenger filed suit in the Southern District of Florida and alleged the various theories of liability in an attempt to hold the cruise ship company liable, including the argument that the company was negligent in failing to keep the zip-line in a safe condition, and that the dangerous condition that caused the accident established that it was a company that did not comply with safety regulations that applied to the type of activity involved. The argument being that the cruise ship company knew or should have known of this fact, and therefore should not have sold the ticket for this particular excursion, and that the cruise line should have warned the passengers about the unsafe operation of the zip-line activity.