Articles Tagged with Princess Cruises

MIAMI, Florida–Another passenger has been reported to have fallen overboard from a cruise ship. Unlike the latest tragedy aboard the Carnival Elation, this story ended successfully. According to news reports, a cruise ship passenger aboard Princess Cruises’ Sun Princess fell into Pacific Ocean when the ship was between Brisbane and New Caledonia at around 4 p.m. this past Friday. The ship was on an 11-day cruise from Brisbane, Australia. Once the “man overboard” announcement was made, the ship turned around in hopes of finding the woman. Life rings and a lifeboat were deployed into the water, and about 45 minutes later, the woman was located by the lifeboat and brought back aboard the ship. There are no details as to why she fell overboard and whether the ship had a man overboard system in place. It seems like either someone spotted the woman falling overboard or the ship did have some sort of system in place because of the quick turnaround time between when the woman was reported overboard and her successful rescue.

ocean-195x300With the increasing number of passengers or crew members being reported going overboard from a cruise ship, even two man overboard incidents in one week, the news of such events occurring is not as shocking as it used to be, but obviously still is alarming as ever. On Ross Klein’s website Cruise Junkie, a site that keeps track of cases involving people going overboard on cruise ships, this high number of overboard passengers and crew members is illustrated. This most recent case on the Sun Princess, along with Ross Klein’s statistics, again points to the need for the cruise lines to step up to the plate and comply with the legislation requiring man overboard systems to be installed on the cruise ships. Clearly whatever system cruises currently have in place is not enough.

On a side legal note, most of the cases we hear about where a passenger goes overboard and is never found, results in little or no recovery against cruise ship company because of a law called the Death on the High Seas Act. Most cases happen when the cruise ship is outside the territorial waters of the United States, which triggers the application of the Death on the High Seas Act. This statute unfairly eliminates any recovery for the surviving family members for their mental anguish, grief, and emotional distress, which is referred to as non-pecuniary damages. The Death on the High Seas Act limits recovery to pecuniary damages, which many times will not be substantial, allowing the cruise ship company to escape responsibility. This is a law that is archaic and needs to be changed. Holding the cruise lines accountable if there is negligence, including failure to follow laws requiring implementation of man overboard systems, provides the additional incentive to make cruise ships safer for all. Instead, making companies more responsible under our system of law has been eliminated in the cruise ship industry by applying the Death on the High Seas Act

MIAMI, Florida-A magistrate recently determined that Melina Roberce must stand trial on charges of importing cocaine on board the MS Sea Princess cruise ship back in August. Ms. Roberce was one of three passengers aboard the Princess cruise ship MS Sea Princess who had been arrested for attempting to smuggle over 200 pounds of cocaine aboard the cruise ship in a suitcase. The big question is how the drugs made it onto the cruise ship undetected.

gavel-300x200Ms. Roberce is only 22 years of age, and pictures show her crying when she was informed that she will stand trial. She was detained by Australian Federal Police along with fellow passengers Isabel Lagace, 28 years old, and Andre Tamine, 64 years old. The three were detained when the cruise ship arrived in port in Sydney Harbour.

All three have been charged with the crime of importing the cocaine. The cocaine is reported to have an estimated street value of $31 million and was found in locked suitcases during the search of passenger cabins. It is reported to be the largest drug bust of its kind on board a cruise ship.

MIAMI, Florida–In alarming news, Princess Cruise Lines, owned by Carnival Corporation, plead guilty to seven felony charges arising as a result of illegal dumping of oil into the ocean. This is not the first time a cruise line has been found guilty of illegally dumping oil into the ocean and covering it up. In fact, Carnival, was previously guilty of dumping oil into the ocean and covering it up. A huge fine was assessed back in the late 1990s against Carnival. Other cruise ship companies, including Norwegian Cruise Line and Royal Caribbean International, have also been guilty of oil dumping and cover up. These major cruise lines have felony convictions, so they should be referred to as felons, with the associated cloud over their credibility that is justified from being a felon.

enchantment-of-the-seas-panama-thumb-450x321-14364-300x214An engineer involved in the operation for Princess Cruises resulting in another huge fine of $40 million dollars, summed up the motivation behind violating international laws and covering up the violations: “It cost too much to properly dispose of oil waste.” Apparently, the cruise line puts profits ahead of the environment, disregarding international laws and covering up their actions, while polluting the waterways. Can we trust these convicted felons when they tell the public their cruise ships are safe when in fact there are in fact a number of reported sexual assaults and disappearances happening on cruise ships?

During Congressional Hearings addressing cruise ship safety and security, I was requested to come to Washington D.C. to testify. I was questioned about safety and security issues on board the cruise ships and what particular laws govern the cruise ship companies. I was surprised that Congress had very little knowledge as to how the cruise ship industry was being regulated, and  that the Congressional committee was not aware that there were no mandatory reporting requirements for the cruise ship companies when a crime happens on board their cruise ship. As a result of these hearings, there has been increased safety legislation and regulation of the cruise ship industry.

Ocean-Star-Pacific.jpgUSA Today reported today a fire in a generator knocked out power to a cruise ship sailing off the Mexican coast over the weekend, forcing the evacuation of nearly 750 passengers and crew. The Associated Press reports 522 passengers and 226 crew members aboard the Ocean Star Pacific on Saturday were evacuated by catamaran to the Port of Huatulco on Mexico’s West Coast.

Fire aboard a ship is a major safety concern, although they do not happen with regularity, and almost all the reported fires have been limited to specific areas aboard the ship and confined and adequately put out without injuries or deaths. However, there have been instances where there have been serious injuries and deaths due to fire aboard a ship. We previously represented over 250 families who lost loved ones who were aboard a cruise ship named the Scandinavian Star. The cruise ship had been operating in Florida for many years under the popular seaescape name, which were one day cruises to nowhere. Although the ship was subject to inspections and certification by a classification society called Lloyds the ship was found to have serious safety deficiencies, including the lack of proper fire alarms, lighting for when electricity goes off, as well as communication among crew for proper response and rescue efforts.

06-03-starprincess-burnt.jpgIn another passenger case aboard a Princess cruise vessel, the Star Princess, a fire onboard spread on the balconies of the ship, causing serious injuries to the some of the passengers. The investigation afterward found that the materials on the ship were inappropriate and caused the fire to rapidly spread.

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